Blogger, Coastword Festival, Event Review, Kelly Talk, Poetry, Written Word

COASTWORD 2017 Dunbar @CoastWordFest @cath_simpson13 @PascaleBientot #Day3

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Dunbar © Kelly Lacey

Our final day was my absolute favourite of all three. I was filled with so much excitement of the thought that I would get to meet Shelley Day again, I first met and heard about her novel The Confessions Of Stella Moon earlier this year at the Linlithgow Festival. There is something so very special about Ms Day, she has this unique calming quality. I think she’s amazing!

The Festival events kicked off with the phenomenal Catherine Simpson, Karen Dietz and the Dunbar Writing Mums with The Places Between Them. Reading from their anthology Nourish Me, Sister. Each Mum taking to the stage to read their work, with beautiful accompanying music from Karen Dietz.  One that resonated with me at the time and has stayed with me was Deborah Ritchie’s Reattachment, it was deeply moving and honest.  Up next was Catherine Simpson with readings from her new pamphlet Mrs Carlyle Had Many Lovers when she was asked to be the writer in residence at this year’s festival, she toured Dunbar, absorbing the feeling and core of the town. Catherine did research of the older local records and discovered very little mentions of the woman. This inspired her pamphlet. It’s lovely to add that her daughter designed the cover. Catherine is warm and approachable, it was wonderful to see and hear her read her wonderful work.

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©Catherine Simpson & Joanne Baird (@Portybelle)  Photo By Kelly Lacey

We were then treated to three songs by the Dubar Sings Choir, with Karen Dietz. My favourite was Imagine Me & You. A harmonious delight to my ears.

Now my favourite event of the whole festival was next up, Confessions and True Stories with Shelley Day and Catherine Simpson. 

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©Catherine Simpson ~ Shelley Day By Kelly Lacey 

With the ladies talking about their books The Confessions Of Stella Moon By Shelley Day and True Story By Catherine Simpson. The hour was simply not long enough. It was extremely surprising to hear just how very hard and anxiety filled the publishing and marketing process really is. Catherine is working on her second novel and has a memoir being published very soon. Shelley has a collection of short stories being released in November and although everyone is shouting from the rooftops for more Stella, she is starting something new, however, Shelley does not rule it out more Stella, perhaps even Moira (Stella’s Mum) in the future.

I was star/ author struck, at being sat in the front row watching and listening to these two impressive, inspirational, genuine ladies. Both with hearts of gold.  It was a real honour and a true highlight of my blogging career.

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©Catherine Simpson ~ Shelley Day By Kelly Lacey 
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©Kelly Lacey

You can purchase the books today.

True Story ~ Catherine SimpsonAmazon UK
The Confession Of Stella Moon Shelley Day~ Amazon UK

To end my Festival visit and review I had another luxury of hearing Val McDermid in conversation with Lorna Hill.

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©Val McDermid ~ Lorna Hill By Kelly Lacey 

Val McDermid shocked me by being extremely funny, her anecdotes of her time as a child growing up in Kirkcaldy and running out of children’s books to read in the library and pinching her mother’s library card were just one of the very funny stories she told. Val explained only the previous night she has finished work on her new Tony Hill & Carol Jordan novel ~ Insidious Intent.  It was an interesting hour and a great end to my journey a the CoastWord Festival.

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You can purchase your own copy of Out Of Bounds by Val McDermid here Amazon UK

Huge thanks from me to Catherine Simpson and Hannah Lavery for inviting myself and Joanne ~ Portobello Book Blog to be CoastWord Festival, 2017 Bloggers.  It was a life moment I will cherish forever. What I take away is how brave all the participants were so open, honest with their words and saying “hello world this is me” with love at the core and how being you is enough!  Lovely for the community to come together and celebrate.

Thanks to my other blogging half of this adventure Joanne Portobello Book Blog   it was a delight to learn more about you and spend time with you.  You made the three days extra special. Thank you.

 

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© @Portybelle & @Lovebooksgroup ~ Kelly Lacey

 

Much Love CoastWord, see you next year

Kelly xx

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© Dunbar By Kelly Lacey 

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Blogger, Event Review, Kelly Talk, Music, Poetry, Scotland, Written Word

COASTWORD 2017 Dunbar @CoastWordFest #Day2

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Dunbar Harbour ©Kelly Lacey

CoastWord Festival Day 2 

We arrived For Day 2 at the Dunmuir Hotel, Dunbar. Joanne from PortobelloBookBlog and I claimed our familiar front row seats, today would be a smorgasbord of poetry, written word and song.

First up was Magi Gibson with local poets Melissa Goodbourne, Jo Gibson, Pen Reid and Ruth Gilchrist.  First up I need to say that I was unaware of how brave poets were. They open their very soul to us through their words and thoughts. So naked and raw, for us to reflect and judge. Telling us how this made them feel or think. It’s beautiful and I was really educated over the whole of the CoastWord festival, it was very enlightening for me.  The hearts of the ladies poems were varied from loss, parents, hysterectomies, slate roofs and even fruit.  Pen Reid had music to accompany her set with Emma on violin. Which was hauntingly beautiful and atmospheric.  My favourite poem from the hour came from Magi Gibson.

My Mother’s Funeral

January. Twelve below. Cold seeps through our coats.
We shuffle, cough, crack quiet graveside jokes
to keep our grief at bay, our breath ballooning white
before our mouths like misty lungs, as if we’re trying
to say, we are the living, we persist.

And then the minister comes, cantillates his dust-to-dust,
and we stand solemnly, prepared to trust
your soul to God, when a blackbird in a frost-encrusted
tree bursts into song. And I remember you, not dead,
not lying in a frozen grave, but in the garden you so loved,
planting, pruning, weeding. Whistling like a bird.

The minister lifts his hands, intones, now let us pray.
From the tree the blackbird flies away.

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©Ruth Gilchrist By Kelly Lacey
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©Jo Gibson By Kelly Lacey
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©Pen Reid By Kelly Lacey
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©Magi Gibson By Kelly Lacey

An Audience with Chris Brookmyre, hosted by Nigel Bird was next on today’s agenda.

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©Nigel Bird & Chris Brookmyre By Kelly Lacey

Nigel Bird started by saying he had previously been in a reading slump, but after picking up three of Chris Brookmyres books he felt he had a literary enema.  Chris Brookmyre was very engaging and funny.  I learned all about how hackers use fun social media games to infiltrate our safety. We’ve all played the ‘What’s your porn star name’ game, right? Well, the answers to the two questions, asked in the game are the most used security questions used by companies to protect us.  I had never thought about that. So it goes to show when we are at our most relaxed, chatting with our friends on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat, clicking share me links that if you don’t you will grow warts and webbed feet, we are in fact vulnerable and that’s exactly the time to be more vigilant and ask why am I doing this.  Chris read from his new novel Want You Gone. I was impressed by Chris’s down to earth nature and his humour.

Janice Galloway, Marjorie Gill, Nadine Aisha and Hannah Lavery had an hour filled with short stories and poems.  From Racism, Sexism, Names, Belonging and Oak Tables all being varied themes.  At the core for most were the sense of not fitting into society’s mould.  It was an empowering hour, Marjorie Gill has a beautiful, warm voice that is like a warm blanket on a chilly night. Its tone makes you relax and feel like nothing could ever be wrong in the world.

Dinner 

Joanne and I had a wee break before the night times entertainment began, we chose to dine at The Dunmuir Hotel, and I am so glad we did.  We both chose the Steak & Ale Pie with Chunky Chips. We followed this up with some glorious desserts, Joanne has the deconstructed cranachan which has tiny real flowers that you could eat (Joanne was very kind and just could not bring herself to eat them)  and I chose the sticky toffee pudding with salted caramel ice cream and treacle sauce. It was all scrumptious and we will definitely be back!

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On Saturday CoastWord Night we had a full three hours of music and performances from Jenny Lindsay, Scott Tyrrell, Faith Eliott, Colin McGuire, Richard Klein and Karen Dietz and Emile Robson.  All hosted by Carey Douglas and Graham Cairns, aka Ant and Dec.

It was a varied night of entertainment, poetry and music. My favourite performance of the night was by Scott Tyrrell. I had tears of laughter on my face from his fantastically funny poetry.  I really enjoyed Karen Dietz and Richard Klein as they took as on a journey of song through American Short Stories. They are perfect together, both unique with their own talents but together they blend with ease.

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©Graham Cairns By Kelly Lacey
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©Faith Eliott By Kelly Lacey
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©Emilie Robson By Kelly Lacey

A terrific evening, if you would like to know more about all the artists please visit CoastWord Festival 2017

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©Dunbar By Kelly Lacey

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Blogger, Coastword Festival, Event Review, Music, Poetry, Scotland, Written Word

COASTWORD 2017 Dunbar @CoastWordFest @thejennawatt @kirstylawmusic #Day1 #Music #Play #Scottish

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Dunbar ©Kelly Lacey

CoastWord Festival 2017 Dunbar  ~ Day 1 

I was lucky enough to be one of this years chosen bloggers along with my friend and fellow blogger, Joanne ~ Portobello Book Blog. We travelled down from Edinburgh on Friday the 19th, filled with trepidation and excitement.

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©CoastWord Bloggers 2017 @Portybelle & @Lovebooksgroup

The festival was held at The DunMuir Hotel in Dunbar. A spacious venue with a large function room. The set for the weekend was made up to look like a comfy livingroom, with a large reading chair and a bookcase with lamp. Setting up an ambient atmosphere.

 

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©Kelly Lacey

 

First to perform was award-winning playwright Jenna Watt, with her play Faslane. Faslane is situated 40 miles outside Glasgow and is home to the UK’s Trident nuclear missile program. I have, to be honest, and say I hadn’t heard about its existence. So it was all new to me. The play is essentially a war of thoughts pro and against Trident,. With Faslane providing years of work for her family members and the inner turmoil of not knowing where her own opinion lay. Jenna visited both Faslane and the peace camps. To help gain more knowledge. It made life somewhat puzzling for her. The play is well executed, there is a lot of dialogue for one person to act out, it’s very impressive. Jenna Wright was a powerhouse, captivating, gentle, loud, memorable. A great thought provoking and conversation starter piece.

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If you would like to know more please visit Jenna Watt’s Website

 

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Kirsty Law By Kelly Lacey ©

Next up was Kirsty Law, CoastWords first songwriter in residence. Kirsty uses a Shruti Box to accompany many of her songs, it is a fabulous sounding instrument that provides a rich drone background. Kirsty’s songs were inspired by the Firth Of Forth and Dunbar. I really enjoyed Moving Up Hill and Water Of War.  Kirsty has a new album in the pipeline and if you would like to know more please visit Kirsty’s Website

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Kristy Law By Kelly Lacey ©

 

A superb opening to the festival, two varied works both unique and highlighting Scotland in their own unique ways. 

Please check out my next few blogs (soon to follow) to read about Day 2 & 3.

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Dunbar ~ ©Kelly Lacey

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Avon Books, Cover Reveal

**COVER REVEAL **The Bed and Breakfast on the Beach @KFrenchBooks @AvonBooksUK

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Three women throw caution to the wind and move from England to run a B&B on a Greek island. They’ve all reached a point in their lives when the need a change – one divorced, on empty nester, one made redundant from the job she’s held since leaving school many moons ago. The move test their friendship to the limits, brings errant husbands running their own metamorphosis, but will they choose to stay in Greece when the holiday season winds down?

The perfect escapist read for fans of Lucy Diamond and Milly Johnson – transport yourself to a Greek island and forget about your troubles with this glorious summery romance.

Kat French lives with her husband, two little boys and two crazy cats. She loves all things romance – reading it, watching it and writing it. She also writes steamy erotic romance as her bestselling alter-ego Kitty French.

Published July 2017 (EB 22 June, PB 13 July)

Pre-Order you copy here ~ Amazon UK

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Author, Q&A

Games People Play @OwenMullen6 @Bloodhoundbook #QA

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An utterly gripping crime thriller from ‘a major new force in British crime fiction.’

Thirteen-month-old Lily Hamilton is abducted from Ayr beach in Scotland while her parents are just yards away.

Three days later the distraught father turns up at private investigator Charlie Cameron’s office. Mark Hamilton believes he knows who has stolen his daughter. And why.

Against his better judgment, Charlie gets involved in the case and when more bodies are discovered the awful truth dawns: there is a serial killer whose work has gone undetected for decades.

Is baby Lily the latest victim of a madman?

For Charlie it’s too late, he can’t let go.

His demons won’t let him.

My Q&A with Owen Mullen

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Hi Kelly thanks for asking me here today, I’ll try to give you some insight into The Real Me.
I’ve been many things in my life – my CV looks a bit like Alan Whicker’s passport.  But, one morning ten years ago when I  decided I was going to write a book, was when I finally found what I should have been doing from the beginning. That started me on a journey I couldn’t have imagined and introduced me to many helpful people, some of whom are now friends. 
Writing the book turned out to be the easy bit. I didn’t realise how much energy and commitment it would take to get my work published.  I’d once thought getting a break in the music business was difficult – the book world is the music business on acid! Long story short: I signed a 3 book deal with the very forward-looking Bloodhound Books in September 2016. Games People Play, the first in the Charlie Cameron Glasgow PI series, launched in January and almost immediately achieved both bestseller badge and entry to the Amazon top 100.   
 
Describe yourself using three words?
Creative  Positive  Focussed

 

What inspired you to write your first novel?  
 
The global financial meltdown, and a most unwelcome electricity bill!

 

What time of day do you like to write?      
I pPrefer to start around 8 am although I am not really a morning person. I find if I don’t get to writing straight away then life takes over and the day is lost.

 

What is your favourite book and why?    
 
I have good memories of really enjoying early Stephen King books like Salem’s Lot and The Dead Zone. For me, he captured the essence of story telling 
How did you pick the title of your book?   
The title for Games People Play came from the old Joe South Song, which stuck in my mind and gave me the idea for the multi layered tale that followed. Old Friends And New Enemies really captures what is going on in the book. Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead came from an old Irish toast. So I guess for me it varies, sometimes an idea from a song or a film etc and sometimes the story decides. 

 

Are the characters in your book based on real people?
Some of my characters come from memories I didn’t even know I had stashed away. Others, I create as the need arises in the unfolding story.  

 

What’s your favourite word?     
Obstreperous – a word my grandfather used…not too many opportunities to squeeze it in! 

 

If you were a colour what would it be?      
Midnight blue 

 

Do you plan your story beforehand or go with the flow?      
Always have both beginning and end, then the flow can commence! 

 

Who is your favourite Author?      
Don’t have one but I really like Conan Doyle 

 

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?    
James  Moriarty from the televised Sherlock – I loved his humour.

 

Are you working on a new project?      
Several – 3 days ago I completed the first novel in an American PI series, today I started Charlie Cameron 4. I have begun a London trilogy, and am putting finishing touches to a Pakistan thriller., which I loved writing. 
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You can order you copy today ~ Amazon UK
Thank you, Owen Mullen, for stopping by my blog today.

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Giveaway Prizes, Launch Day, Q&A

Handcuffs, Truncheon and a Polyester Thong – @ginageejay @urbanebooks #Giveaway

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Meet Mavis Upton. As mummy to 7-year old Ella, surrogate to far too many pets and with a failed marriage under her belt, Mavis knows she needs to make some life-changing decisions. It’s time to strike out into the world, to stand on her own two feet … to pursue a lifelong ambition to become a Police Officer. I mean, what could go wrong? Supported by her quirky, malapropism-suffering mum, Mavis throws herself headlong into a world of uncertainty, self-discovery, fearless escapades, laughter and extra-large knickers. And using her newly discovered investigative skills, she reluctantly embarks on a search to find her errant dad who was last seen years before, making off with her mum’s much needed coupon for a fabulous foam cup bra all the way from America. Follow Mavis as she tackles everything life can throw at her, and revel in Gina Kirkham’s humorous, poignant and moving story of an everyday girl who one day followed a dream.

My Q&A with Gina Kirkham

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Describe yourself using three words?

Fun, quirky, caring

What inspired you to write your first novel?

I retired from Merseyside Police in 2012 after having a wonderful career as a front-line Police Officer. Over the years, I found that humour was one of the best coping mechanisms you could have to help you deal with the not so pleasant side of the job. “You couldn’t make it up” or “You could write a book’’ were two very familiar phrases you would hear after dealing with certain situations, so on my retirement I took the opportunity to do just that.

What time of day do you like to write? I tend to produce more words between 10 am and 2pm but I have my most exciting ideas for my characters at 3 am. When my mind is working overtime, sleep is impossible and my hubby’s snoring becomes too much to bear, I creep downstairs for a hot chocolate, a couple of biscuits and a stint in front of the keyboard. Two hours and 1,200 words later with another 2lb added to my already burgeoning derrière from the sneaky biscuits, I crawl back into bed, only to wonder what planet I must have been on when I re-read my nocturnal offerings at 10 am!

What is your favourite book and why?

To Kill A Mocking Bird, Harper Lee. I first read this as part of my English Class curriculum in the early 70’s. I remember being so strongly touched by the subject matter, I felt every emotion there is as I progressed from chapter to chapter. It dealt with such serious and intense issues, but still carried humour and warmth.

How did you pick the title of your book? Originally it was titled Handcuffs, Truncheon & A Primark Thong. The first part, Handcuffs, Truncheon, is a reflection of the police theme of the story and the Primark Thong is a reference to my main character, Mavis Upton’s love of cheap frillies from Primark. Once signed by Urbane Publications and after discussions, it was decided to replace Primark with Polyester to alleviate any potential snags with the trademark. So, my book is now titled Handcuffs, Truncheon & A Polyester Thong. I did wonder how it would all fit on the front of a book, but Matthew my Publisher, has done an amazing job.

Are the characters in your book based on real people?

Yes, absolutely, it made the development of the characters so much easier too, as I could actually hear their voices and see their features, gestures, and mannerisms. I know there will be quite a few people desperately trying to find little traits to identify themselves. I hope I can keep them guessing!

If you were a colour what would it be? Gosh, now that’s a difficult one. I do tend to wear a lot of black or grey, as I feel it helps me to sort of ‘blend in’, but those colours actually belie my personality. I think I would have to say I’m yellow, as I’m very fortunate to be a happy person. I know I must smile a lot because I’ve got the most horrendous crows feet and ‘prinkles’ (as my granddaughters call them) around my eyes!

Do you plan your story beforehand or go with the flow? I draft up an outline with bullet points and ideas on a whiteboard. It’s not set in stone, I have a basic idea of where I am going, but I take each day as it comes. Often I will have a fixed idea of what I want to write that day, and then suddenly one of the characters will become very awkward, like a naughty child, and I have to re-think their progress. I frequently tell them to behave or I might have to kill them off!

Who is your favourite Author?

Peter James. Although I write lighthearted humour, I’m actually a huge crime and supernatural/ghost story reader.

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?

Bill Sikes in Olivier Twist. Even though he was Dickens most savage and violent book character, I’d like to think he was really a big softy at heart and just a bit misunderstood. I’d have him marrying Nancy and opening a home for wayward boys and girls after realising the error of his ways. I’m probably slightly biased in my view of Sikes, as I had a juvenile crush on Oliver Reed who played him in the musical Oliver!, so my observations are more likely based on my adoration for him rather than the character itself, if I’m honest.

Are you working on a new project?

Yes, I’m currently 45,000 words into the second book following Mavis’s adventures. I’m having a lot of fun with this one as the storyline I have chosen plays on my own experiences, whilst at the same time allowing me the opportunity to research an unusual aspect of his life for one of the characters.

Do you have any upcoming events our members can attend?

Publication date for Handcuffs, Truncheon & A Polyester Thong is the 18th May with a launch at Waterstones Liverpool One at 6.30pm that evening. It will be a fun event with Liverpool Actor Lynne Fitzgerald reading from the book as the main character Mavis Upton and an appearance by Luca Veste (Murphy & Rossi crime series) for a ‘Conversation with’. Complimentary Prosecco and cupcakes will be available and a gift of one of Mavis’s Humongously Large Thongs with each book purchased on the night. There are other events planned but as yet, dates have not been confirmed.

Twitter – @ginageejay (personal) @MavisUpton (book character)

Author Website – http://www.ginakirkham.wordpress.com

Amazon UK

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Giveaway 

Win a copy of Handcuffs, Truncheon, and a Polyester Thong & A THONG!!!

     CLICK TO ENTER ~ BEST OF LUCK

 

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Author, Giveaway Prizes, Interveiw

Lizzie’s Daughters ~ Rosie Clarke ~ @Aria_Fiction #QA #Giveaway

 

Lizzie's Daughters cover.jpgFROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF LIZZIE’S SECRET and LIZZIE’S WAR.

LONDON 1958. Lizzie Larch battles to keep her daughters safe and out of harm’s reach. Perfect for the fans of Nadine Dorries and Lyn Andrews.

Lizzie adores her beautiful and clever daughters and will do anything for them. Both possess a wonderful creative flair but have fiercely different characters. Betty, the eldest, is headstrong like Lizzie’s first husband whilst Francie is talented and easily influenced.

When Betty runs away after an argument with Sebastian, heartbreak and worry descend on the family.

At great risk to her health, Lizzie finds herself pregnant but is determined to give Sebastian the son they craved.

Sebastian meanwhile is plunged into a dangerous overseas mission using his old contacts to track Betty to Paris and to the lair of the rogue that seduced her.

Consumed with guilt, can Sebastian right the wrongs of the past and finally unite his family and friends?

My Q&A with Rosie Clarke

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Please tell my readers a little bit about yourself and your publishing journey. 

Rosie Clarke is happily married and lives in a small Cambridgeshire village with her husband.  She has now written well over 150 books under various names, which you can find at www.lindasole.co.uk and news of Rosie Clarke at www.rosieclarke.co.uk

Rosie has been writing for about 30 years now and has been successful with various genres but Lizzie’s Secret was a best seller at amazon and is one of her most successful and these books are what she really enjoys writing these days.  In the past she has written quite a few historical romances as Anne Herries and other sagas as Linda Sole and Cathy Sharp.  The books based in London’s East End that she is now engaged in writing are very close to her heart and evoke memories of a childhood spent with Grandma and Uncle Tom in one of the suburbs and many trips into the city for pantomimes, visits to Petticoat Lane and the Mall after the coronation, Princess Margaret’s wedding and other events. She well remembers seeing the scars of the war, bombed-out sites where the grass was growing through that still needed clearing, and the shortages and rationing that followed.

Describe yourself using three words?

Happy ~ Wife ~ Author

What inspired you to write your first novel?  

I’ve always loved making up stories and was at a stage in my life when I needed something to keep my mind occupied because my beloved dog was unwell.  Being an avid reader of romance at that time I wrote a historical romance that was eventually published as The Witch Child, under the name of Lynn Granville.

What time of day do you like to write?

I prefer mornings because that’s when I am fresher and able to sit at my computer for several hours.  However, I read through what I’ve written in bed so perhaps that’s work too, though it always seems like pleasure.

What is your favourite book and why?

Of my own books I think probably I like Lizzie’s Secret best so far but when it comes to other authors there’s so many to choose from: For years I’ve said that Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell is my favourite book and it still comes high on the list, but there are so many other books I enjoy and recently one of the authors I’ve most enjoyed has been Matthew Harffy.  He writes excellent books on Saxon England.  The Serpent Sword is the first in a wonderful series. I really enjoy this series of books because this author brings the period to life in a way that is easily understood even if like me you only know a smattering of the history.  His hero becomes real as the series progresses and so he is one of the authors I would rate with my favourites.

How did you pick the title of your book?

Lizzie’s Daughters is the third in a series of books set in WW11 and it took a lot of consultations with my agent and publisher to decide what the first book should be.  We tried things like Hats Off for Lizzie Larch!  and Stylish Hats and Broken Hearts, lots of different ones that were liked but not quite right and then I thought of Lizzie’s Secret and everyone approved.  After that it was easy enough to go on with Lizzie’s War and now Lizzie’s Daughters.

Are the characters in your book based on real people?  

No, not in whole, though every character I write has some basis in an observation I’ve made of someone.  A lot of them have my opinions and some have characteristics of people I know.

What’s your favourite word?  

Love

If you were a colour what would it be?  

Yellow

Do you plan your story beforehand or go with the flow?

I know how it starts, how it ends and bits all the way through, but the rest comes as I write.

Who is your favourite Author?  

I have a list of favourites.  Elizabeth Gill in sagas, also Carol Rivers, Nadine Dorries.  In ancient history, Matthew Harffy.  In Regency Georgette Heyer.  In mysteries, Anita Davidson.  They are the books I mainly read, though I try lots of other authors. Often I find a new author when her book is sold for 99p on amazon and then, if I love the book, I go back and buy everything she or he has written.

You are attending a dinner party with four fictitious book characters who would they be and why?

Scarlet O’ Hara, Gone With the Wind, because I admire her guts for doing whatever she has to, to protect her family and the land she loves.

Beobrand, The Serpent Sword, because he is a fierce Saxon warrior but comes over as such a real human being that you can identify with his fears and needs

Arabella, Heyer Regency of the same name, because she taught me to love bold heroines, who were enchanting and mischievous.

Sebastian Winters, from Lizzie’s Secret, because he’s the kind of male guest you need at any dinner party, guaranteed to keep all your female guests happy.

What book are you reading at the moment?

I’ve been reading the third of Anita Davidson’s mystery trilogy:  Knightsbridge Mystery

Where in the world is your happy place?

My home, in particular, my garden and my study.  I also love holidays in Spain.

If you had one superpower what would it be?

I would like to be able to stop all the terrible wars that are hurting people at the moment and restore the destroyed homes to what they were so that there were no refugees.  Unfortunately, only God could do that.

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?  

He wasn’t really a villain, though the Romans thought so.  I would like Spartacus to have taken his people away from the Roman Empire to freedom.

Are you working on a new project?  

Yes, I have a wonderful new series called The Mulberry Lane series.  The first is The Girls of Mulberry Lane and that is available in August we hope.  I am working on the second at the moment, probably title A Wedding at Mulberry Lane, but that is not yet fixed as the book isn’t finished.  After that, there are others planned about this community in London set in WW11.

Do you have any upcoming events our members can attend?  

Not at the moment, I’m afraid.  I was recently on Radio Cambridgeshire and I tweet fairly often but that’s about it. What I can tell you is that the Lizzie books are coming out in mass market paperback over the next few months and Lizzie’s Secret is already in hardback, which means it can be borrowed from the library.

Thank you so much for giving me space on your blog and I hope your readers will enjoy the frank answers to your questions.  Best wishes, Rosie

Thank you, Rosie Clarke and Aria Books for being on my blog today.

Website

http://rosieclarke.co.uk/

Links to buy

Lizzie's Daughters cover

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Win a copy of Lizzie’s Secret 

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LONDON 1938. A gritty, heart-warming and wholesome drama about two girls united in friendship and tested in love. Perfect for the fans of Katie Flynn and Nadine Dorries.

Lizzie Larch is a twenty-year-old hatmaker in London’s East End. She is happy and popular, but she carries a secret. Seven years ago she was viciously attacked and recovered in a private sanatorium where she miscarried a child.

Lizzie has no memory of the night of the attack, but secrets cannot stay secret for long. When she starts courting her boss’s nephew, shocking revelations surface, and threaten to destroy their newfound happiness.

Set in the East End of London at the dawn of World War II, Lizzie’s Secret is about how ordinary people learn to survive – and triumph – through hardship and tragedy.

CLICK TO ENTER ~ GOOD LUCK

 

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Author, Excerpt, Q&A

Lord Of The Sea Castle @ruadhbutler @AccentPress #Extract #QA

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It is 1170  a tumultuous time for the people of Wales, England and Ireland. Raymond de Carew is in love, but the woman he desires is an earl’s daughter and so far above his station that he has no hope of ever winning her.

However, Raymond s lord has a mission for him: one that if it succeeds will put an Irish king back on his throne and prove Raymond worthy for in Norman society, a man can rise as high as his skill with a sword can take him.

With only a hundred men at his side, Raymond must cross the ocean to Ireland ahead of his mercenary lord’s invasion. There he will face the full might of the Viking city of Waterford… and either his deeds will become a legend or he will be trampled into dust.

Ruadh Butler 

A Butler

Ruadh Butler was born in Northern Ireland. He worked in newsrooms, bars and laboratories, and as a security guard, musician and lifeguard before his acclaimed debut novel, Swordland, was published by Accent Press in 2016. Charting the years of the Norman invasion of Ireland Swordland, and its follow-up, Lord of the Sea Castle, published in 2017, are a tribute to his ancestors who carved lands for themselves as part of the conquest in the 12th century.

Q&A with Ruadh Butler

Please tell my readers a little bit about yourself and your publishing journey before the questions that would be super.  Plus anything else you wish to tell the members.

I grew up during the Troubles in Northern Ireland. It seems strange, given that there were daily bombings and shootings, and soldiers on every street, but it really didn’t have a direct effect on me or my family. I put this down to my dad being a bit of a posh ‘blow-in’ from south of the border. No one knew how to deal with our ‘English’ sounding accents and frequent holidays to the Republic! It is probably because of this background that all my work so far has circled the subject of identity and a questioning of nationalism (in all its guises).

It was never an ambition of mine to write a novel. I love reading. I have done for as long as I can remember and as a kid nearly everything I read had the grand backdrop of history; Herge, Goscinny and Uderzo were first, then Morgan Llywelyn, Mary Stewart, Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson, before Bernard Cornwell came along and I became more than a little obsessive, reading and re-reading his books a number of times. It simply never occurred to me to write since all I really wanted was the next book of Sharpe, Starbuck and Derfel’s escapades!

My first attempt at writing was a book called Spearpoint. Told from the perspective of Dermot MacMurrough, an Irish king exiled from his throne by his enemies in 1166, it simply didn’t work, principally, I suppose, because Dermot was a little too unsympathetic as a lead character. So I began again, this time from the angle of one of the real-life Norman mercenaries who Dermot had employed to help him reclaim his kingdom. With a bit of patience – and a number of re-writes – the book once called Spearpoint became The Outpost with the Welsh-Norman knight Robert FitzStephen as the protagonist for the first time. Further work and fine-tuning (mostly during my lunch break at work) saw The Outpost become Vanguard. It was only when I was certain that the book was ready for public view that I sent it to my father’s sailing pal, the late Wallace Clark, a respected (and much missed) travel writer, for his assessment. He loved it but suggested a name change. Thus, Swordland was sent out for the consideration of literary agents. I soon found a good one in London and a little while later it found a home with Accent Press. Swordland was published in paperback in April 2016.

 

Describe yourself using three words?

Talkative, redheaded, upbeat

 

What inspired you to write your first novel?

It was only when I began studying journalism in London in 2007 that the kernel of an idea to write a novel took seed. I was staying with a cousin and came across a whole raft of journals about the Butler family, and, having only the vaguest knowledge of what that meant, I started investigating. They had come to Ireland in the wake of the Norman invasion of 1169 and had won a large estate at the point of a sword. The more I read, the more I wished to find out, and not just about the Butlers, but about all the people who had become embroiled in the invasion. I had found an untapped treasure trove of stories, of intrigue and adventure, of men and women, in a land so alien to modern eyes. They were stories of remarkable deeds and fascinating characters. I had to write about it. I didn’t know how, but I wasn’t going to let that stop me.

 

What time of day do you like to write?

Mornings are for editing and re-reading, evenings are for writing. Although coming up to a deadline that schedule goes out the window! I used to be a journalist and spent a lot of time sitting down at a computer screen. At lunchtime I would work on the novel, my feet up on the desk, sandwich in my hand and laptop on my knees. It wasn’t long before I developed a very sore back. Because of this trouble I began standing up to write when I got home. It’s the best change I have made! It forced me to improve my posture and you would be shocked to learn how many more calories you burn up just by staying upright. Another benefit of standing is that you are forced into taking regular breaks rather than just continuing on working when you really should stop for a bit. It takes a bit of getting used to, but I thoroughly encourage all to stand while writing.

 

 

What is your favourite book and why?

Cripes! That’s a tough question. How does one get it down to just a single book? Under duress – and discounting several novels for the most minor reasons – I think that I can get this impossible task down to two: Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson and The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers.

The former is one of the best adventures in literature and has one of its greatest heroes – Alan Breck Stewart. Kidnapped is packed full of intrigue and really serious themes including nationalism, loyalty, murder, slavery, love, and, above all else, hope in spite of all the odds. Stevenson also gives the reader a wonderfully evocative journey around the Highlands and Islands of western Scotland, its flora and fauna, its people and their beliefs.

Childers’ book is simply the best spy novel ever produced (although there are a few others that I really love). Two more unlikely heroes you could not hope to find, and I don’t think anyone else would’ve made their setting amidst the mud and shifting sands of the Frisian Islands. Childers’ love and knowledge of sailing in that region is obvious and infectious. If I can do even half the job portraying the Irish coastline as he does the continental, I think I’ll be really happy with the final outcome in my books.

 

How did you pick the title of your book?

My first book, Swordland, went through a number of titles until my father’s great friend, Wallace Clark, a writer himself, suggested the final word of the novel as a better name than the one I was using. I trusted to his judgement and thankfully it worked out very well!

When it came to writing my second, I already had the title before I committed a single word to the page. I wanted something that continued the theme of war as well as signifying my lead character, Raymond’s ambition to rise through Norman society. When I visited Baginbun Point in County Wexford as part of my research, the name came to me. Baginbun is remote and not well known, its importance to the history of Ireland marked only by a small plaque. I found it incredible. I fancied that I could feel the presence of my ancestors on that windswept headland. Better than that, I could stand upon the Norman earthworks and could see why they had elected to make Baginbun their landing site. It was a castle designed by nature and augmented by Raymond’s warcraft. It would be the scene of my climactic battle and Raymond’s glory. The book would be called Lord of the Sea Castle.

 

Are the characters in your book based on real people?

All the characters are lifted from history, but their activities are given a fictionalised twist. The story is based on the writings of a Welsh priest, Gerald de Barri, as well as the 13th century epic chronicle, The Song of Dermot and the Earl. There are a number of inconsistencies between the two accounts and that, to me, gives me licence to embellish and enhance some of the story, but I do admit all my changes at the end of the novel. One instance of this is the back story for my protagonist, Raymond de Carew. Nothing is known about him before he landed in Ireland in the summer of 1170 and so I have attempted to discern what might have been in order to flesh out the character. The same is to be said of Alice of Abergavenny, a woman who comes into Raymond’s life during the book and really drives the entire story. Some writers in my field aim for historical accuracy. My objective is period authenticity.

 

What’s your favourite word?

Converse

 

If you were a colour what would it be?

Burgundy – lovely colour, smashing region, delicious wines

 

Do you plan your story beforehand or go with the flow?

A bit of both actually. As a story set in history there are elements that have to remain the same. However, I tend towards the ‘fiction’ side of the argument and have often found gaps in the historic record which I feel need to be filled (without moving the story too far in the direction of alternative history). This may be as simple as placing a point of view character at a historic event which I know they did not attend, or even combining two people whose stories are similar to streamline the account. In Lord of the Sea Castle I saw an opportunity to give Alice of Abergavenny a much bigger role than the one afforded by history and I leapt at the chance to do so.

 

Who is your favourite author?

Oh no! Another impossible question to answer! My favourite writers include Robert Louis Stevenson, Bernard Cornwell, Joseph Conrad, Simon Scarrow, Ben Kane, Arthur Conan Doyle, David Gilman, H. Rider Haggard, Conn Iggulden, John Buchan, Giles Kristian and Henning Mankell. To choose one over the others is next to impossible.

 

You are attending a dinner party with four fictitious book characters who would they be and why?

That is a stressful undertaking at the best of times! But inviting our literary heroes? My mind immediately goes to what to serve – Argentinian-style steak and Malbec perhaps. The big question, however, is if you choose guests you think might get on, or people with different personalities and backgrounds, hoping that they will find something to talk about? I’ve decided that two ladies and two gents would make for the best night’s craic.

Portia from The Merchant of Venice would be the first to arrive, almost definitely on time and bearing a well-thought out gift. She comes across as intelligent and level-headed, good company with an ability to talk to anyone. If we are playing after-dinner games I definitely want to be on her team.

Alan Breck Stewart from Kidnapped might still believe the Hanoverian fuzz are after him so I’ll leave the back door off the latch so he can slip in as he pleases rather than use the front door. I am certain he will like the food and drink, but might put the pressure on everyone to make a donation towards the cause of the King-over-the-Water. Note to self: do not mention “The Red Fox” around Alan. It will only set him off.

Say what you like about Cersei Lannister, but she will add a bit of class to proceedings. I think she might be difficult at the start. Liberal glasses of wine will loosen her up. A night away from her cadre of court officials and all that intrigue and back-stabbing in King’s Landing will be good for her too. I’m betting she is a hoot if you can keep her off the subject of politics (and her family).

Why do I think that Cersei and Jay Gatsby would get on like a house on fire (if we can prise him away from the Long Island shoreline that is)? I’m not usually a matchmaker, but I think they would make a healthy couple. He could worship her as she wishes to be worshipped. And he could get access to her world of high grandeur and ancient prestige (albeit in Westeros rather than West Egg) that he so desires. If not, well I presume we can still all get a taxi over to Gatsby’s house and see in the wee hours there!

 

What book are you reading at the moment?

Trespass by Anthony J. Quinn, a noir literary crime story set in post-Troubles Northern Ireland. I’ve read the first three in the series and this one is the best yet. They are all beautifully written. I’m very much looking forward to the next which is out in November.

 

Where in the world is your happy place?

I’ve travelled a bit and have been some wonderful places, but few have the impact of Kilkenny. When my family first came to Ireland in 1185 they settled at Nenagh in County Tipperary and it wasn’t until 1391 that they moved into Kilkenny Castle. My branch of the family split off from the senior in the early sixteenth century, and the castle has since been given to the people of the city, but it still evokes strong feelings in me. My last visit was a few years ago. I did a summer research trip all around the south-east with the last stop in Kilkenny before heading back north. Sitting on the parkland in front of the castle in the summer sun, seeing people from the city enjoy the open space was just wonderful. It isn’t home but I do take a great deal of pride in the place. Completely silly!

 

If you had one superpower what would it be?

Consistent good luck, I think. I’ve had a bit of good fortune, of course, but it is not something you can rely upon. Having it on tap would be most welcome! Invisibility is one that a lot of people might choose, but you can’t stay invisible all the time. You might lose control with super-strength and hurt someone. The world would become a bit of a blur if you were constantly moving at Flash-like speeds. Good luck could only improve the experience of life. And some of it has got to rub off on those around you!

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?

I like the thought that somehow Professor James Moriarty managed to survive his tumble over the Reichenbach Falls, just as did Sherlock Holmes. Perhaps he had always wanted the opportunity to retreat into obscurity, leaving his criminal past behind. I actually have a cousin who is called Professor Moriarty, in his case Chris Moriarty, and this no doubt affects my choice. No more pleasant a chap could you hope to meet than my Professor Moriarty. It makes me grin to think of him, a mild-mannered world-renowned expert in eels as an undercover Napoleon of Crime!

 

Are you working on a new project?

My next novel is called The Earl Strongbow and will follow on from the events of Lord of the Sea Castle and the tumultuous events of 1170. It is scheduled to be released in April 2018. I also have an idea for a film script which I would like to try and write. I’ll not say too much about it, but I will require a trip to Sligo for research purposes.

 

Do you have any upcoming events our members can attend?

I will be appearing at the Kildare Town Medieval Festival in August and hope to get a few more events organised too.

Sneak Peak ~ Extract 

Extract from Lord of the Sea Castle by Ruadh Butler

Danger lay upriver. That, Raymond could feel in his bones as Waverider glided up the brown waterway where vegetation circled slowly and sank beneath her plunging wooden oars. On each side of the ship, trees hung limply, the longest branches dipping into the river from the bank and blanketing the land beyond from the Norman’s view. The sails had been robbed of wind by the tangle of trees and the summery conditions, and so the men rowed, their dipping oars the loudest sound on the slowly swirling river. It was stifling, this country and the sensation was not helped by the heavy armour which clad each warrior who journeyed north.

‘See anything?’ Fionntán asked. William de Vale hissed at him to quiet down. Everyone aboard, except the smirking Gael, conversed in hushed tones as they floated towards Cluainmín. Those who had been on ship during Amaury de Lyvet’s foraging trips told tales of darts, arrows and stones arcing suddenly from the shore from assailants unknown and striking down men as they toiled. Oddly Raymond had yet to meet anyone who had been wounded whilst sailing on the River Banneew despite the oft-told tales.

‘I can see nothing out there,’ Raymond squawked back at the Gael. His turn rowing was over and so he had taken up a position in the bows of Waverider, keeping watch on the shoreline for dangers unseen in the shallow riverway. Bright sunshine turned still pools of water on deck into vapour and more steam hung from dripping green leaves on shore. Beads of sweat ran down Raymond’s brow and he could feel more beneath his mail. The strong summer sunshine danced off shimmering surfaces and dazzled his eyes. As they rounded another bend in the Banneew, he espied a small homestead and farm carved from the forest. Two shirtless fishermen with long beards paddled coracles in the river, sweeping sculls in small circles to propel the ungainly craft forward. Both men gawped as Waverider swept past and began paddling with all their might for the riverbank. Raymond laughed at the men’s effort, their unwieldy vessels providing no speed for their getaway. The little coracles rocked as the wake from Waverider struck them and the fishermen clung onto the animal hide sheer-strakes as they span towards the reedy shallows.

‘How are we for depth?’ Amaury de Lyvet called from the starboard quarter. The steersman’s question was echoed up the boat by several men at the oars to the warlord’s earshot.

Raymond looked over the side into the brown, sandy river and began swinging the sounding line around his head. The hollowed out lead weight spun as it flew, dragging the thin knotted rope from his hand and forward over the bows of Waverider. As the lead hit the water, Raymond began doubling the line between his outstretched arms. He felt the weight impact with the riverbed and, as the line ran alongside the boat, he began counting the fathoms. He did not get far.

‘Less than three fathoms,’ he shouted back at Amaury, earning another appeal from William de Vale to keep his voice down.

‘Slow oars,’ the steersman shouted to the crew of Waverider. Happy to stop the work, the men complied immediately and sat back on their benches, swiping sweat from their faces.

‘What is her draught?’ Raymond asked Amaury as he walked down the length of the ship.

‘Two yards and a bit,’ the sailor replied. ‘Enough, I hope.’

‘But you have been further up river than here,’ Raymond said. ‘Haven’t you?’

Amaury raised his eyebrows, but did not answer.

‘No time like the present for a bit of exploring,’ Fionntán interjected. ‘The Ostmen can get up the river, so we can too. What is the bottom like?’ he asked.

Raymond swung the wet sounding line and caught the lead weight so that he could study a thick wad of tallow which he had pushed into the space where the rope was tied. As it had been dragged along the bottom the sticky material had picked up debris.

‘Nothing but sand,’ Raymond said as Amaury and Fionntán swapped concerned glances. Raymond had learned that the Gael was also a sailor and knew the waters of Ireland’s south coast as well as any man. The two launched into a conversation about whether or not they should continue upriver on foot or by ship. After a few minutes of discussion between the two, Fionntán sat down at his bench and Lyvet gave the order to continue rowing.

‘And you,’ Amaury added with a finger pointed at Raymond. ‘Keep your bloody eyes open. I don’t want to ground her on this damned sand.’ The journey continued as slowly as before with the noise from the sounding line falling in the water the only thing interrupting the squeak of wooden oars on the rails of the ship. The men continued to toil as the sun shone above them.

‘Two fathoms,’ Raymond shouted as the river began to narrow and sweep westwards. Amaury pulled the tiller into his stomach sending Waverider into deeper water closer to the eastern bank.

‘Keep bloody casting,’ he shouted at Raymond, but the warlord was no longer listening for, over a vast expanse of rushes and mud flats, were the masts of many ships. And beyond that, the Ostman longfort of Cluainmín came into view.

Raymond inhaled sharply as Waverider slid into enemy territory.

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You can pre-order your copy ~ Amazon UK

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Edinburgh Event, Event Review, Kelly Talk, Theatre

Jane Eyre @edtheatres Festival Theatre #Edinburgh #Review #Theatre

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I met Jane Eyre for the first time last night in Edinburgh. I do believe she will stay with me forever.  In the National Theatres production, directed by Sally Cookson, the performance run is over a period of 3 hours. The stage is set in a such a simplistic style by Michael Vale but works marvellously well.  Wooden catwalks raised platforms and ladders are the main core of the set. With a small band on the stage also, which somehow disappears to the eye when the show begins.

JANE EYRE UK Tour 2017Royal National Theatre
Nadia Clifford (Jane Eyre) NT Jane Eyre Tour 2017. Photo by BrinkhoffM+Âgenburg

Nadia Clifford as Jane Eyre is strong in her role, from start to finish she demands your attention in a fervent but gentle way. Tim Delap is fascinating as Mr Rochester, his performance is loud and important the chemistry between himself and Nadia Clifford is electric, with the two bringing to life these staunch characters in a beautiful and extraordinary way.

JANE EYRE UK Tour 2017Royal National Theatre
Tim Delap (Rochester) Nadia Clifford (Jane Eyre) NT Jane Eyre Tour 2017. Photo by BrinkhoffM+Âgenburg

With a cast of ten in total, with many playing various roles. Some comedic relief came from Paul Mundell’s whimsical performance as Pilot the dog.  The show is fast paced and the music is superb. With some modern tunes snuck in which was a delightful surprise.

JANE EYRE UK Tour 2017Royal National Theatre
NT Jane Eyre Tour 2017 ensemble. Photo by BrinkhoffM+Âgenburg

I give the show five stars it is a one I would go and see again and again. Each time I know I would see and take away something different. The show runs until the 20th May at The Festival Theatre, Edinburgh.

Book your tickets: Edinburgh Theatres Website

Thank you to @Edtheatres for the review opportunity.

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Author, Q&A

Block 46 @JoGustawsson @OrendaBooks #QA

BLOCK 46 COVER AW.indd

Evil remembers…

Falkenberg, Sweden. The mutilated body of talented young jewellery designer, Linnea Blix, is found in a snow-swept marina.
Hampstead Heath, London. The body of a young boy is discovered with similar wounds to Linnea’s.
Buchenwald Concentration Camp, 1944. In the midst of the hell of the Holocaust, Erich Hebner will do anything to see himself as a human again.

Are the two murders the work of a serial killer, and how are they connected to shocking events at Buchenwald?

Emily Roy, a profiler on loan to Scotland Yard from the Canadian Royal Mounted Police, joins up with Linnea’s friend, French true crime writer Alexis Castells, to investigate the puzzling case. They travel between Sweden and London, and then deep into the past, as a startling and terrifying connection comes to light.

Plumbing the darkness and the horrific evidence of the nature of evil, Block 46 is a multi-layered, sweeping and evocative thriller that heralds a stunning new voice in French Noir.

Q&A with Johana Gustawsson

Describe yourself using three words?

Certified totally crazy!

What inspired you to write your first novel?

My paternal grandfather’s life story inspired Block 46: he was a French resistant who was deported to Buchenwald in 1943. He was neither a loving father nor a caring grandfather, and I was always intrigued by the fact that everyone in my city used to praise him and talk about the hero he was. I knew of course about his involvement in the war, but I didn’t really understand what it implicated physically, morally and mentally, until I dived myself into the Nuremberg trials and the testimonies of the survivors, surrounded by the barbarity, the violence, the hunger and the desperation. I then understood that the trauma was so deep, that he could not be a man anymore, he could just be a hero.

What time of day do you like to write?

I write whilst my little one is at pre-school, but my favourite part of the day is early mornings when the city and the house are still quiet… which I won’t have for long as I am expecting twin boys!

What is your favourite book and why?

Ooooh! So hard to choose! But I would say Les Fleurs du Mal, a volume of French poetry by Charles Baudelaire. The writing is sublime and reading it feels like listening to a divine music.

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How did you pick the title of your book?

I originally named Block 46 “Y”, as this novel talks about paternity and transmission, but my French publisher didn’t like it, so I thought that Block 46 was very adequate, as the block 46 in Buchenwald concentration camp is where the story begins.

Are the characters in your book based on real people?

A few years back, I read a book about a South African profiler: Micki Pistorius. I admired her passion, devotion and focus, which inspired me for Emily Roy. About my other female protagonist, Alexis Castells, I have to admit that we share the same European background, between France, London, Spain and Sweden!

Do you plan your story beforehand or go with the flow?

Oh, I definitely am the planner type! As I need to carefully plant clues here and there in order to make it difficult for the readers to find who did it, I set up the skeleton of the book before writing.

Who is your favourite Author?

If I really have to choose one, it would be Agatha Christie. Since my youngest age, her talent has mesmerised me; she shaped crime writing and left us unforgettable plots and characters.

agatha

 

You are attending a dinner party with four fictitious book characters who would they be and why?

Hercule Poirot, my dear Belgian detective, who I met at 7 reading The Mysterious affair at Styles; I have been utterly devoted to him ever since; Miss Marple, another of the unforgettable characters created by the Queen of crime; Sherlock Holmes and his brilliant deductive mind; and finally, Tom Ripley who would be killed during the pre-dinner drinks. The perfect occasion to witness Hercule, Sherlock and Jane Marple at work, don’t you think?

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What book are you reading at the moment?

A Darker domain by Val McDermid, but in French… as I need not lose touch with the language I write with! A gripping read.

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Where in the world is your happy place?

Anywhere, as long as I am with my family.

If you could give any literary villain a happy ending who would you chose?

I am hesitating between Mr Hyde and Dr Hannibal Lecter…

hannibal-lector

Are you working on a new project?

I am currently working on Roy & Castells 3, as number 2 was published in March in France and will arrive in the UK in May 2018. This time, I am diving in the Franco dictatorship years, in Spain: terrifying times…

Do you have any upcoming events our members can attend?

Oh yes! I will be at Waterstones Piccadilly in London on the 17th of May with fourteen wonderful Orenda authors who are travelling from all over the world for the occasion; I will also attend Crimefest, in Bristol, from the 18th until the 20th of May, and I have been invited to The Felixstowe book Festival the Sunday 2nd of July. Hope to see you at one of those events!

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Thank you, Johana Gustawsson and Orenda Books for allowing me on this fabulous tour!

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FINAL block 46 blog tour poster

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