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The Tainted Love Of A Captain @janelark @HarperImpulse

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The sounds and scents of the Crimean War are strangling Harry Marlow, shutting him off and silently smothering his soul. But he is a soldier and that is his life, and he can see nothing else besides that. So why should he care when a woman watches him? His life is not one to share with a woman, other than for a few moments in his bed.

When a woman is already drowning so deeply in sin she is without any fear of judgement – what can it matter if she chooses to begin a new affair? It is like escape to choose her own man and Captain Marlow is the perfect candidate for a dalliance. All she has to do is obtain an introduction…

Guest Post By Jane Lark 

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For all you hopeful writers… Pantser or Planner? Writing a series.
If you are a very organised writer (unlike me) then to plan your series you probably started with an ending and take steps backwards in a story, plotting them through a chart and timelines, and marking relevant events and links that you want to put in and create.

My head likes to start with a vision at the beginning, I see an opening scene, as though the book is a film, and then my characters tell me where they want it to go.

Advantages to being a planner: You can fully think the whole thing through and know where your next scene is taking you and why.

Disadvantages: If you know where you’re going, generally so does your reader as you leak in the clues.

Now there are three ways to manage a plot twist…

  1. Let the reader know right from the outset so they are in on a character’s secret but have the suspense of waiting to see the impact on others (I have used that in a couple of my stories).  For instance in The Illicit Love of a Courtesan I mention that she has a son at the very beginning and an editor asked me if I wanted to take the thought out. I left it in because I wanted the reader to be wondering how that would impact on her future.

  2. To hint in the book that a plot change is coming, so threading clues through. I have done this in most books, usually by back tracking as I don’t plan, but I think there’s an excitement in reading and thinking you have worked the story out, and know what’s coming but you don’t know when or how it will manifest and another part of you is thinking, am I right?
  3. Give absolutely no clues and then drop the twist in. Now if you are a reader like me my mind starts spinning back through a story trying to work out how on earth that fits, and were there clues I missed. Putting in clues that people miss is something very hard to do, I always guess endings – the film Sixth Sense is running through my mind. But if you are pantser and you don’t think of the plot twist until the point it hits, then no one is going to guess it, are they?

The Marlow Intrigues stories are linked rather than a rolling story, so you can pull out a book in the middle, or pick it up with this book right at the end and still enjoy it without reading the others. But if anyone reads the last book in the Marlow Intrigues series and tells me they guessed what the plot would be, I know they couldn’t have guessed it because I didn’t know it until a year before I began writing the story and that was after the other books were published so sorry there are no clues. Although there is one tiny planned hint that might just make the addicts of the series more alert from the beginning of the book 😉

Order your own copy of The Tainted Love Of A Captain here: Amazon UK

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